FAQs

Aspen Foot & Ankle is your Utah connection to looking and feeling your best.

Our physicians and staff have the proficiency, knowledge, and dedication to provide innovative care to you and your experience with us.

Contact us today to set up an appointment.

Do you have questions?

Here are answers to some of our most frequently asked questions?

  1. Why do I have a copay charge on my bill?
  2. Why is my copay higher when I see your doctors?
  3. Why do I have a copay for follow up visits?
  4. The doctor only spent a few minutes with me, why should I be charged for an office visit?

1. Why do I have a copay charge on my bill?

Copays are due at the time of service. The copay charge is assessed when we have to send a statement to collect your copay that was not paid when you came in. Each statement may generate an additional charge for unpaid copays. If you always pay your copay at the time of service, you will never see this charge.

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2. Why is my copay higher when I see your doctors?

Many insurance companies have a separate specialist copay written in to their policies.  In other words, they require a higher copay when you see a specialist.  Although we disagree with these higher copays, we are obligated to collect the copay amount your insurance policy assigns.

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3. Why do I have a copay for follow up visits?

Every return visit is a follow up visit, whether it occurs in a few weeks or several months from the initial visit. All office visits, with the following exception, require a copay.  The only time you don’t have a copay for a return visit is when you are in a surgical global period.  This occurs when you have had a surgical visit and are returning for care related to that surgery such as suture removal or concerns about the incision.  If you return to the office during a global period for an unrelated concern or procedure, you will be charged a copay.

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4. The doctor only spent a few minutes with me, why should I be charged for an office visit?

Office visits are charged not only for the time involved, but for many other components.  The doctor must pay someone to answer his phones, make the appointment, greet you when you arrive, prepare a chart and escort you to an examination room and so on.  The office building and equipment is another expense that must be taken into consideration.  The doctor’s visit itself may not be lengthy, but requires the doctor to exam you and make a diagnosis based on many years of education and experience.  A diagnosis that is quick for one of our doctors to make, might be puzzling to another who is not skilled in podiatry.   Essentially, patients request  the doctor to formulate an opinion and treat their condition, whether it takes just a moment or involves a longer time.

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